Home » Government » City and Humane Society at odds over former county shelter, funding to repair CVCA elevator and Pool timeline discussed at Nov. 23 council meeting.

City and Humane Society at odds over former county shelter, funding to repair CVCA elevator and Pool timeline discussed at Nov. 23 council meeting.

A former lease, dating back to the 50’s on the old County shelter facility is a point of contention between the City and the local humane society which held the original lease. The outcome will determine the use of the land and building located below Globe’s cemetery.

Cheryl Brazell of the High Desert Humane Society made a presentation to Council outlining the ways the organization serves the community and set out her case for occupying the former County animal shelter, which includes land and a 1952-vintage building located on Hackney at the Globe Cemetery.

According to Paul Jepsen, Globe’s city manager, the facility, had been dual-owned by Gila County and the City of Globe until recently when the County moved Animal Control into a new facility out by the fairgrounds. He went on to say the County gave the city a quitclaim on the old facility, and as a result, the City now has full ownership of the property, including the land and the building.

Brazell believes the building and the lease were designed to benefit the HDHS when the humane society leased the building in the ‘50s. She said it was set up on a 99-year lease and required the facility be used as a dog rescue and shelter for the life of the lease. 

The organization later sublet the facility to the County in 1973 because at the time, Brazell says,  HDHS didn’t have the staff or funds to keep it running themselves. 

The City believes there is a legal question as to whether the facility was sublet to the County. Their position is the sublease would have broken the original lease unless the City had given written consent to the sublease.

According to Jepsen, the City’s legal counsel is researching the issue, and he says even if their finding confirms his belief that the lease is no longer valid, the Council will have the power to go ahead and do what they feel is right in terms of supporting HDHS, whether that could involve a buyout or donation/contribution of some kind.

At issue is the use of the land, and the city is also looking at the land to expand the cemetery, which is at capacity. According to Jepsen, the land would provide space for 140 additional plots. 

At this time HDHS is locked out of a building they say is theirs. Jepson, says the City has an obligation to determine the legal situation before they permit access.

Brazell believes HDHS had properly obtained the City’s consent to the sublease. But added that even if documentation of that consent can’t be found, “the City acquiesced to the sublease for all those years, and they can’t now claim they didn’t consent to it. That, however, is for the legal people to work out,” she said.

Brazell said HDHS would like to occupy the building, which would allow them to put their funds toward other expenses, but they are also willing to sell the property to the City.

Brazell is hoping the old facility could be used for overflow from their current location in downtown Globe, especially for housing noisy dogs, and isolating animals that might be carrying a contagion. Due to Covid, HDHS has been forced to hold onto dogs longer than in the past because landlords and insurers are refusing to accept big dogs.

The HDHS plays an important role in the community through an array of services including caring for animals, helping low-income people with veterinary care – including vaccinations, running a thrift store and a furniture store, giving items to people in need, and running a trap–neuter–release program that has so far fixed about 500 cats.

Councilman Pastor asked whether HDHS could partner with the County at their new facility. Brazell explained that her organization wants to remain nonpolitical, and second, they have different philosophies from the County, such as being no-kill. They believe it isn’t a good fit. 

Councilman Shipley asked whether the HDHS could use a different building somewhere else. Brazell said they would consider any suggestion. Councilman Pastor pointed out that the building is in poor condition and would need repairs.

Jepson said at this point, the City would continue to work on clarifying the legal situation, continue to look at alternative sites for the HDHS, and get more information about the City’s need for space at the cemetery. The issue will be brought back at a future meeting.

 

Community Center pool rehab timeline firms up

Council heard an update and timeline for the Community Center pool rehab project. Linda Oddonetto, the City’s director of economic and community development, said the pool team met last week and firmed up the timeline as follows:

October 29, 2021 – January 4, 2022 Pre-construction phase, including design of the pool and splash pad
January 3 – April 15, 2022 Manufacturing phase
January 5 – February 4, 2022 Demo
January 24 – May 13, 2022 Installation/repair phase
April 1 – 21  Install pool membrane
April 1 – 7 Install splash pad components
May 3 – 4 Fill pool with water
May 12 Official pool test and final inspection
May 13 Punch list
May 13 Contractor hands keys over to the City

Budget gap narrows with new BHP participation

In terms of budget, the total base cost is coming in at $1,280,597. In addition, the zero entry and splash pad will cost $518,959, the bulkhead will cost $280,815, the bulkhead anchors will cost $5,000, swim team accessories will cost $85,288, and the gas heater will cost $185,000.

With the addition of the heater, the City will be able to offer a longer swim season than ever before, Oddonetto said.

Finally, the rehab of the pool facility is budgeted at $250,000, to be completed in a future phase.

The City currently has $1,310,000 in committed funding, as follows:

ARPA funds (City) $500,000
Admin contingency (City) $30,000
ARPA funds contingency (City) $180,000
Freeport Community Investment Fund Grant $250,000
United Fund of Globe-Miami Grant $200,000
Arizona Complete Health Grant $50,000
Capstone Pinto Valley Donation $100,000

This leaves a project funding gap of $470,659. 

But in recent days the City also gained a new pool partner – BHP – making an additional $150,000 available and reducing the project gap to $320,659. BHP had already provided $100,000 for the splash pad.

Council honors Citizen’s Academy graduates

Council started the November 23 meeting by acknowledging the successful conclusion of the City’s first Citizen’s Academy series. Diplomas were presented to participants Jody Daggett, Patricia Daley, Tammy Guerrera, Bryan Gunhoe, Samuel Kannegard, Bodey Kervin, Regina Ortega-Leonardi, Mary Lowery, Dylan Majica, Tracy Quick, Sherry Rice, Nancy Rutherford, and Dan Moat. 

The City plans to repeat the series in March and April.

 

Council honors Citizen’s Academy graduates

Council started the November 23 meeting by acknowledging the successful conclusion of the City’s first Citizen’s Academy series. Diplomas were presented to participants Jody Daggett, Patricia Daley, Tammy Guerrera, Bryan Gunhoe, Samuel Kannegard, Bodey Kervin, Regina Ortega-Leonardi, Mary Lowery, Dylan Majica, Tracy Quick, Sherry Rice, Nancy Rutherford, and Dan Moat. 

The City plans to repeat the series in March and April.

Staff proposes new procurement bidding process

Council heard a presentation on a proposed contract with Sunny Path Associates LLC that would represent a new procurement bidding process.

Finance Director Jeannie Sgroi said the current process takes about 8 to 10 weeks to complete a public solicitation. Members of the Finance department staff have been creating all the necessary documents and taking them through the steps to reach contract award. 

However, given the number of projects, the process could easily support a full-time contract specialist position, and the City is looking toward hiring a person for that role.

In the meantime, staff are requesting turning to an outside firm, Sunny Path Consulting, to prepare bid documents. Sgroi outlined the consultant’s qualifications and proposed a professional service contract not to exceed $50,000 for FY2021-2022 for possible approval at the next Council meeting.

Jepson said the City is eager to hire a contract specialist and will be posting a new position soon, but the consultant’s help will be needed for this budget cycle. The City has a lot of projects coming up due to funding opportunities that are currently available. 

The contract being proposed with Sunny Path is an hourly contract, so the City will be able to use the consultant only as needed.

 

The arts center elevator, a vital element in providing access to the 2nd and 3rd floors, was struck by lightning earlier this year.  Repairs will cost $29,905. Photo by LCGross

 

Motions approved

Council also approved motions for the following:

  • Accounts payable in the amount of $225,293.72
  • A contract with Ja Lin Enterprises to furnish a part-time admin for clerical duties
  • Dedication of approximately 4,744 sf of land on Tebbs Street for a right-of-way – which had been quitclaimed to the City nearly a century ago. Dana Burkhardt, Zoning Administrator, said a quitclaim deed by Carl Eider granted the property to the city in 1924, but the parcel was never properly accepted by the City. The discrepancy was just discovered while the City was reviewing a request by the mini-golf property.
  • Rezoning of 1.32 acres of property at 5824 S. Miami Gardens from the C-2 intermediate commercial zoning district to the transitional residential (TR) district. The site is a single-family home on land adjacent to the hospital that had been annexed from the County sometime in the 1990s. Apparently, no one noticed that this residence was within the annexation, so it was zoned C-2 along with the rest of the land. This rezone will bring the property into conformance with city zoning designations. The rezone has gone through the proper process and there has been no opposition to the request.
  • A series 12 liquor license for Rodney Lynn Courtney dba Kari’s Copper Cantina at 999 N. Broad Street. This is a new liquor license and has gone through the proper process with no public comment in opposition. The restaurant is currently working under a temporary interim license.
  • A contract with Sandoval Elevator Co. not to exceed $29,905 for repairs to the elevator at the Cobre Valley Center for the Arts. The City hopes insurance will pay for the repairs and is aiming to complete the repairs by December 15.
  • Extension of a professional services contract with HUB Planning and Urban Design LLC (Dana Burkhardt) for one additional year (to February 24, 2022), and increasing the initial contract amount to $50,000.

Members of the Globe City Council: Mayor Al Gameros, Vice Mayor Mike Stapleton (District 4), and Council members Freddy Rios (District 1), Mike Pastor (District 2), Jesse Leetham (District 3), Mariano Gonzalez (District 5), and Fernando Shipley (District 6). All members except Freddy Rios were in attendance at this meeting.

To view this meeting online click here.

To view documents related to this meeting, click here

 

The Globe City Council meets every second and fourth Tuesday of the month at 6:00 p.m. at City Hall. The meetings are currently open to the public at 50% capacity. Members of the public are requested to wear a mask except when seated. Seating is limited to allow for social distancing..

To speak to agenda items before or during the meeting, you can call or text (928) 200-0154 or send an email to council@globeaz.gov. If you desire to speak to the Council during an agenda item.

 

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