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Treating foot pain non-surgically may be the better choice

Eight years ago, a woman came to my office because she was in pain from an ankle injury. The injury had happened 20 years earlier, but now she was experiencing pain every day, whenever she was on her feet. She was scheduled for surgery. At that time I had been working with a treatment method that had benefited other patients, and I suggested it to her. It is called prolotherapy, and it involves having a series of injections in the problematic joint. This woman agreed to try the weekly injections for her ankle. After we had done a few injections, she felt comfortable in canceling the surgery. Not only that, but she wanted the other ankle done, too. Eight years later, she is still very active, and she never had to have surgery. Read More »

Water is Life

(First published on May 31 2014)  Native artists bring a message to San Carlos in a mural Thanks to three young Native artists and a grant from a national organization affiliated with world-renowned street artist Shepard Fairey, an eleven and a half foot mural of an Apache woman now stands behind the Peridot Shopping Center off Highway 70. High above the ground, freshly pasted onto the side of a water tank, she cannot be missed. Her eyes gaze off into the distance; she appears noble and strong. Wearing a speckled camp dress and a t-necklace that hangs level with her elbows, she holds yellow pollen in her hands against a backdrop of crosses. Blue-green paint is sprayed all around her, representing water. Read More »

Our Lady of Blessed Sacrament celebrates 100th anniversary

Our Lady of Blessed Sacrament during its construction. Notice the donkey in the foreground. Beasts of burden like this one were used to haul supplies to the church property during its construction.

One hundred years ago, the tiny town of Miami was bustling with new growth – its population, economy and spirituality.  Not only was a J.C. Penney’s store, a YMCA, the hospital, the sewer system and Miami High School built, but the church known then as Our Lady of Mt. Carmel was busting out of the walls of its Church Hill location. It is now called Our Lady of Blessed Sacrament. This growth prompted the visiting priest, Fr. Joseph O. Barrette, to ask his bishop to allow him to work a smaller area so he could concentrate on the boom town of Miami. The father served the parish from 1911 to 1923 during a time that priests generally only served four or five years in one area. Read More »

Exploring the Globe Cemetery.And some of its lesser known stories

Globe Cemetery headstone for Woodmen of the World, circa 1898

 With its weathered, and often cracked headstones dating back to the late 1800s, it’s easy to let the Globe Cemetery capture the imagination. Covering roughly 32 acres of land in the hills on the west end of town, its entry lined with tall, ominous cypress trees (also known as graveyard trees), there is much to wonder about the cemetery’s long history and those buried below. To this day, some people are still buried in the “old” sections of the cemetery with their families, if their family claimed a plot many, many years ago, says Pam Leonard, the cemetery administrator at City Hall. Newer plots are still purchased from the City of Globe. Read More »

Swallowing Clouds

Swallowing Clouds Local chef and wonton soup connoisseur shares his love of the Chinese tradition

Local chef and wonton soup connoisseur shares his love of the Chinese tradition “Wonton soup means swallowing clouds,” Chef John Wong says. “It’s a weird translation, you know how English doesn’t translate to Chinese, and vice versa.” When a wonton (dumpling) is cooked, it floats up in the soup’s broth. That’s where the Chinese name comes from. “That’s a cloud, and you’re supposed to swallow it,” Wong explains. “The preferred way of eating wonton soup, wonton meaning dumpling, is to eat it whole.” Read More »

Celebrating Healthcare: What’s new in January

JANUARY January is traditionally the time to make resolutions for the new year—and there’s good sense in that. There’s power in stating intentions and setting goals. Take some time to relax and reflect on the past year and the year to come. Make a list of things you’d like to accomplish or changes you would like to make in the coming year. Remember that effective goals are SMART: Specific, Measurable, Attainable, Relevant, and Time-limited. Click here  for more tips for goal setting and how to actually achieve your health-related and other goals. National Blood Donor Month  Every day, approximately 39,000 units (pints) of blood are needed in hospitals and emergency treatment facilities to help save the lives of accident victims and treat patients with cancer and other diseases. Blood is traditionally in short supply during the winter months, particularly in January, so this month has been designated National Blood Donor Month to encourage donors to give blood. The components of one pint of donated blood can help save the lives of three people. Click here for a list of places to donate blood.  Healthy Weight Week – Jan. 16-20 (2017) Healthy Weight Week is all about understanding that health isn’t about ... Read More »

Masons host annual Clothe a Child at Bealls Outlet

It was only 8 a.m. on a Saturday morning and already the parking lot was full and the lights were on at Bealls Outlet in the Walmart center.  Select families with small children were arriving for their appointed shopping spree thanks to the White Mountain Lodge and a program they launched several years ago to support area kids at Christmas time. Jim Rasmussen is a member of the White Mountain Lodge and says they team up every year with local retailer, Bealls Outlet to make this holiday season alittle happier for local children ages five to ten years old who might not otherwise get much under the tree. Volunteers are on hand to help parents and children pick out items and their purchases are made possible through donations made to the White Mountain Lodge#3 in the name of the Dave Johnson Memorial Clothe a Child fund. Approximately thirty children are selected for the program with fifteen children from Globe and fifteen children from Destiny. According to Rasmussen, this was the first year this program did not include Miami because another group came in from Saddlebrook and took Miami kids under their wing.  Read More »

From Pain Pills to Heroin: An epidemic

Heroin and opioid use in the Globe-Miami area has escalated to the point that no amount of arrests can slow its advance, and experts at a recent Town Hall meeting want the community to be aware and concerned. “We can’t arrest our way out of this problem,” Globe Police Chief Mark Nipp said after referring to his department as a blunt instrument that serves as a referral agency to deal with the problem. Read More »

Traditional toys and caring adult interactions are best for young kids’ learning

Globe-Miami-Payson, November 2016– When it comes to promoting learning for children 5 and younger, basic toys and quality time with adults are the best gifts an infant, toddler or preschooler can receive. But what about all those flashy, electronic toys with lights and sounds that we see advertised so much this season? One Northern Arizona University researcher has studied whether they provide an advantage to a young child’s learning. Anna Sosa, director of the NAU Child Speech and Language Lab in Flagstaff, set out to see which everyday activities promote the best environment for babies and toddlers to learn language. Early language development is critical to a child’s learning. And babies, toddlers and preschoolers need to hear a lot of language in order to best learn how to speak and eventually transfer those skills into reading and writing. Read More »

Dreams become reality through University of Arizona College of Medicine – Phoenix ‘Pathway’ to medical school hopefuls

Pathway Scholars Program accepting applications until December 1st  for 2017/2018 academic year   PHOENIX, AZ (November 14, 2016) For many Arizonan’s, attending medical school is a dream that may seem unattainable for many reasons. Some financial, some because of other obstacles in their lives. The University of Arizona College of Medicine Phoenix is changing that equation with their Pathway Scholars Program (PSP), specifically in the rural areas of Arizona. Read More »